Let’s Talk #Reflective Fashion

Although I am always happy to talk about reflective bike fashion, a few things converged recently to prompt a post about reflective-ness. A New York Times article, new reflective clips from Bookman, and the Fall time change all mean more ways and reasons to be reflective!

The recent New York Times article, “Go Glam into the Night: For the Bike-to-Work Generation, a Move to Fashionable High Tech Clothing,” explored how bike clothing “grew up” and became “fashionable” by making office-friendly clothing reflective. The article called out a few companies I already adore, like Vespertine NYC and LFlect, others I am familiar with, including Fik:Reflectives and Betabrand, and introduced me to a fun new one, Henrichs (these capes are so adorable! And limited edition pink and glitter reflective ones? Where is my credit card?!).

The Henrichs Cape (Photo courtesy of the Henrichs website)

The Henrichs Cape (Photo courtesy of the Henrichs website)

Women’s fashion sports clothing companies such as Athleta and Lululemon are also adding reflective clothing to their lines. These pieces are made for runners, not cyclists, but there are obvious ways these can crossover. Look at how cool the “Light It Up” reflective skirt from Lululemon is, and the “Scuba Hoodie,” with it’s reflective hood! I love the idea of pulling this skirt over pants or leggings or jeans – not entirely work appropriate, but definitely for biking home from the gym, or a casual evening out. The “In a Flash” sweatshirt I can see wearing to work. Athleta offers a few pairs of running leggings with respectable amounts of reflective trim down the leg, and I can see pulling these on under skirts or dresses to bike home after dark. When we turn our clocks back this weekend, it will be darker earlier, but still not too cold to rule out the skirts, and then these would be perfect.

Lululemon Light It Up Skirt (photo courtesy of Lululemon website)

Lululemon Light It Up Skirt (photo courtesy of Lululemon website)

What I like about these garments is that these designers are finally realizing that gear worn outside, especially in the darker hours, should have a bit more reflectivity than just the token logo on a corner, or on the ankle. Here is an example of what I consider bad reflective trim – this adorable “Cyclocape” from Terry Bicycles has a single line of reflective trim down the center of the back. Although the unbroken line isn’t a bad idea, it doesn’t give any sense of how wide the wearer is, so how much room to give the cyclist, and what if if was covered by a backpack or bag strap?  (Don’t get me wrong, if someone wants to gift this to me, I’d happily test it out!) These black Terry “Metro Crop” pants have reflective trim inside the side slits, so they don’t offer much reflective-ness at all.

Terry Bicycles Cyclocape (photo courtesy of Terry Bicycles website)

Terry Bicycles Cyclocape (photo courtesy of Terry Bicycles website)

Title Nine has a decent collect of clothes with reflective trim, and although this “Slip’n Ride” commuter skirt is another example of questionable print choices, I like that the reflective trim is on the outside hem, right where you want to be visible to a vehicle.  REI’s Novara winter cycling pants have reflective stripes down the entire leg as well – just like my reflective pants!

I love the latest pants I made!

I love the latest pants I made!

I also point all of this out because Time is “falling back” this weekend, and it will be darker longer. Although I don’t believe that us wearing reflective clothing gives drivers license to NOT pay attention to cyclists (and pedestrians) on the road, I don’t think it hurts to be defensive about what we wear either. I wear a bright red coat partially because it shows up better in headlights than a solid black jacket would – the reflective Vespertine belt I wear with it simply helps.

Red coat, reflective trim on skirt, purse - hugging an owl in Copenhagen

Red coat, reflective trim on skirt, purse – hugging an owl in Copenhagen

It is easy to add reflective accessories, less expensive, and perhaps a bit more versatile to have something that can be moved from jacket to shirt to skirt, like the Bookman clips or the options from REI. Or there is always another route – Glimling is a Swedish-American company selling Scandinavian style reflectors that can be attached to purses, backpacks, coat zippers, or panniers. I have several and love them. They are so cute on my purses! Elisabeth, the owner, totally gets the importance of reflective-ness, and loves to share this somewhat staggering statistic – 70% of American pedestrian accidents happen after dark, while in Sweden, the number is much lower, 40%. Adults and children alike in that country wear reflectors – we saw them for sale in bookstores and dollar stores and in the airport when The Mechanic and I were in Denmark and Sweden, too. Check out her blog post with visibility tests.

Assorted reflectors on assorted bags - some I bought in Sweden, some are from Glimling

Assorted reflectors on assorted bags – some I bought in Sweden, some are from Glimling

So what am I saying here? Reflective clothing is going fashionable and mainstream for biking and running, yay! Designers are beginning to figure it out, and maybe by next winter, we’ll see even more. If buying reflective blazers and dresses is not your thing, or you can’t afford to (I know, the cool stuff is always so expensive!), consider accessories with a good amount of reflective coverage, and attach reflectors on strategic points.  The least it can do is make you a bit more visible!

 

 

A Much Needed Change

An impromptu trip to IKEA last night meant that I unexpectedly spent Sunday building IKEA furniture. At last, I redesigned my workspace! I think this will make me more productive, since I won’t be buried under crap, or at least might have it organized a bit better.

This desk configuration was done recently, to give me more sewing table space:

Computer on my old sewing table, an old school desk, plus several pieces of mismatched storage units

Computer on my old sewing table, an old school desk, plus several pieces of mismatched storage units (sorry for the blurry photo!)

More space for the machines, but still with mismatched storage pieces

More space for the machines, but still with mismatched storage pieces

So my day went from flat pack boxes to wide open desk space:

 

I still have piles of stuff that doesn’t yet have a home, but I plan on figuring that out this upcoming week. Regardless, having this open space makes me feel so much better! This much needed change makes me feel a bit more professional, with matching/coordinated space. Now I can focus on the changes I want to bring to my blog.

You maybe have noticed, if you are a regular reader, that I recently changed the look of my blog. I am trying to come up with something a bit more sophisticated and TinLizzie, reflective fashion-appropriate. I’m not entirely sure what that is, but I’ll know it when I find it. In the meantime, I am working on refocusing my blog to be more on bike clothing and fashion. I’d like to find more bike fashion designers to talk to, especially bike friends like Bike Pretty and Cleverhood and velojoy. I know I have much to learn from them and their experiences, and if you aren’t already following them, well, you are missing out.

So stay tuned while I tinker with things – more much needed changes coming!

Still building!

Still building!

Talking with a Bike Clothing Designer – Part 2

Last week, I introduced Lauren Steinhardt, and shared her background and thoughts about designing bike clothing for women. Catch up on Talking with a Bike Clothing Designer – Part 1, if you haven’t read it yet.

This week, Lauren shares some trade secrets about the sports clothing industry, her research into what women like to wear while biking, and how the fashion industry predicts trends.

How did you end up designing bike clothing? What was your Master’s thesis research like? What prompted it?

I’m big into utilitarian design, reuse and recycling, and living lightly upon the earth. But I’m also a Libra, and I like things to look pretty (seriously, it’s bizarre how many clothing designers are Libras). I had a huge collection of pretty vintage skirts and dresses, and I started making these little bloomer/pantaloon things to wear under them for biking, that I made out of vintage or thrifted fabric. Then I started selling them at craft fairs, but I quickly found that it’s hard to grow from that size because the options for small-scale manufacturing are nonexistent in this country. (Though that’s slowly changing, and I’m very excited about that). I decided to go back to school for clothing design, and realized that instead of going to a debt-factory private college for a grossly overpriced associate’s degree, I could actually get a Master’s degree and do my own research, all without going into crazy amounts of debt.

I hear you - massive amounts of research at the end of writing my MA thesis!

I hear you – massive amounts of research at the end of writing my MA thesis, but such an amazing experience!

My Master’s thesis research was one of the most amazing experiences of my life! I did qualitative research, which means I actually sat down and interviewed people and then reviewed what they told me. I interviewed about a dozen women, who were so kind and supportive of my project. They invited me into their homes, made me tea, spent a long time discussing what they wore to bike to work and how they felt about it. In the end I felt like I really touched upon a need and a subject that doesn’t get enough attention. I also did a lot of research into the historical connection between bikes, the dress reform movement, and first-wave feminism, which is absolutely fascinating.

Amelia Bloomer, in her "Bloomer suit," one of the most well-known images of the "rational dress" movement in the mid-1850s. (Image from Wikimedia Commons)

Amelia Bloomer, in her “Bloomer suit,” one of the most well-known images of the “rational dress” movement in the mid-1850s. (Image from Wikimedia Commons)

How many designs to fashion designers for a company like REI do per season that don’t get used? How far in advance do they design?

This can vary depending on circumstance and the way a particular company operates. Usually, we have what’s called a line plan that is created with the merchandising team, which gives the basic outline of what new styles we will be doing that season (example, three men’s tees, men’s MB shorts and jersey, etc). Sometimes with something like tees, we’ll design more than we need and sort through them to choose the best ones. Sometimes we’ll do a totally new style or range of styles, but then the budget will change and the styles will be dropped before production, or pushed back to another season. In a bigger company and especially with technical performance pieces, the development cycle can be at least a year out and sometimes as long as 18 months.

Do designers look to current shapes and colors; New York Fashion Week; etc? Check out the Pantone Color of the Year? Are they influenced by professional athletes, and what they wear?

First I’d like to say that these are great questions! I’m glad to share a little peek into how the clothing “sausage” gets made, and maybe get people thinking a little bit about the consumer decisions they make.

I mentioned earlier that many companies have a long development cycle. Because of this, most companies use style forecasting services like WGSN to predict trends in color, silhouette, and consumer interests. Really there are only a handful of these forecasting companies, so most clothing companies are relying on the same trend forecasting data, which is why there are consistent themes across various brands in a given season. In the active/outdoor/bike market we also pay attention to tech and performance trends. Trade shows like Outdoor Retailer and Interbike are a good place to get the scoop on that.

Interbike - this looks like so much fun! (Image from Interbike website)

Interbike – this looks like so much fun! (Image from Interbike website)

Another aspect that goes into design choices for performance/active/outdoor clothing is that it can be fairly expensive, and most people purchase it as a well-researched investment piece. If it’s too overtly trendy it can be a turn-off for the consumer because they want to wear it for a long time without looking dated. Thus, trends move slowly in the outdoor industry.

Most professional athletes are sponsored by major activewear brands, which can be great brand publicity. For instance, Nike outfits everyone from Tiger Woods to Serena Williams, and Burton does the US Olympic snowboarding team. These partnerships can definitely drive innovation that filters down to the consumer level.

Women’s urban bike clothing is still a fairly niche market. How have you seen it grow in the years you’ve been designing?

I thought Novara’s urban line was just delightful, and I am so happy that I got to be a part of it. I hope they keep doing it! Right now it seems that women’s urban cycling is still too small of a market for the big guys to pay attention. But in a way I think this is a blessing, because it’s keeping the door open for smaller, women-owned companies to get a toehold and become industry leaders.

Thank you again, Lauren, for your insights into the world of women’s bike clothing! This has really helped me see lines including the Novara line differently. Maybe I’ll complain less about what is being offered, knowing a bit about what goes into making each garment. And I will definitely do what I can to support smaller, women-owned companies become industry leaders!

IKEA Rain Poncho – Look Out, Cleverhood!

IKEA always has the most fun stuff for such good prices, and I can’t ever leave there without spending more than planned. But I certainly wasn’t expecting to find a gray print rain poncho with reflective trim for $6! Look out, Cleverhood! IKEA copied you!

The poncho packs into its own small bag, which then acts as the front pouch pocket, which is a nice feature. The pocket flap, the two arm slits, the neck, and, rather randomly, a bit of the elasticized hood are all trimmed with reflective material, although there is nothing on the back other than the neck. The elasticized hood is a bit odd, and combined with the big Velcro flap under the chin, makes the face opening so small that it is hard to see out of. It does fit under my helmet, but the hood is large enough to fit over my helmet as well. I discovered this one evening when it started to rain heavier than expected, and I didn’t want to stop and fuss with the hood. The fabric is very lightweight, which makes it easy to fold into the pouch, but means that the fabric flapped up as I biked in the rain, and my back got wet.

 

It is longer than my Cleverhood, so it covers more of my bike, but because it is not made for biking, it doesn’t have the extremely useful thumb loops the Cleverhoods do, so I clutched the fabric and my handlebars at the same awkward time. Functional, for $6, but not very comfortable.

 

I wouldn’t use this IKEA poncho in a heavy rainstorm, because I am not confident it would keep me dry for too long. However, it’s not a bad backup to have, in case of an emergency. I could keep it at work, so if I need to bike home in an unexpected rain storm, I would be more comfortable than without. People with cars might want to think about keeping one in their vehicle emergency kit, although the solid black version is not a good idea at night. But if you are interested in a real rain cape, definitely splurge on the Cleverhood. Besides, you will be that much more fashionable in one!

Talking with a Bike Clothing Designer – Part 1

Lauren Steinhardt came to my attention when she commented on my review of the REI Novara Whittier Dress – she was the designer! How cool to get feedback! I looked her up on LinkedIn (I’m such an internet stalker) and her background sounded really interesting – she has a Master’s Degree in Apparel Design from Oregon State University, and her thesis was on Women’s Commuter Cycling Apparel!  So I took a chance and asked if I could ask her some questions about her background and experiences with bikes and designing clothing. Luckily for us all, she agreed!

This part of the interview lets Lauren explain a bit about herself and her experiences and influences. The second part, to come next week, focuses on the retail and sports clothing industry, and how it relates to what we wear on our bikes.

Which came first? Bikes or fashion?

Well, I don’t really consider myself a “fashion” designer. I design clothing, but it isn’t always fashionable, depending on its end use and the needs of the company. In fact, I can’t say I endorse the “fashion industry” in regards to fast fashion and stuff, but it is important to make a nice looking product that makes people feel good when they wear it or engage with it.

Novara Whittier Bike Dress

Novara Whittier Bike Dress

Starting from about age five, I always knew that my future vocation would be to design clothing. I had bikes growing up and as an adult, but my relationship with them has always been a utilitarian one – how can I use this device to get me from point A to point B, and why is my clothing not made for bike riding when it seems like guys’ clothing is? I didn’t start riding recreationally until I moved to Portland in 2002, mostly because there is such amazing bike infrastructure here and it’s so easy to get around.

What is your favorite type of biking?

My favorite type of biking is everyday biking. I commute by bike and use it to get around town. This is mostly my personal area of interest for designing bike-friendly clothing too. I think it would help more women get out there on their bikes. I’d like to try some bike camping or bike-packing – sounds like it would be fun!

Me wearing Lauren's dress (on a Capital Bikeshare bike, of course)!

Me wearing Lauren’s dress!

How many bikes do you own?

Just one, it’s an 80s Nishiki road bike frame that has commuter rack and fenders. My favorite bike ever was a vintage Roadmaster Cape Cod 3-speed that I got at the thrift store in Olympia :)

What is your favorite biking destination?

I like to ride my bike around the city; I never take my car downtown so that is a frequent bike destination for me. Some of my other favorite spots are Mount Tabor, Sellwood Park, and Blue Lake.

What would your dream vacation be?

Probably a long backpacking trip – maybe into the Olympic rainforest? I want to be Mick Dodge when I grow up.

Mick Dodge - I didn't realize he was a National Geographic star! (Image taken from National Geographic website)

Mick Dodge – I didn’t realize he was a National Geographic star! (Image taken from National Geographic website)

What are your favorite bike accessories and fashion companies? What do you use and why?

I don’t do a lot of clothing shopping myself, and when I do I tend to stick to the basics. But there are a few companies that have been making really exciting products that I want to give a shout out to. Iva Jean started out making rain capes and now they have expanded their line with some really cute pieces. And BetaBrand is a fantastically inventive company that accepts design submissions from the public.

The Iva Jean Reveal Skirt (Image taken from Iva Jean website) - I really want to try this skirt

The Iva Jean Reveal Skirt (Image taken from Iva Jean website) – I really want to try this skirt

Where do you look for inspiration?

My #1 source of inspiration is my own experience. What feels good, what’s easy to use, what do I feel comfortable in? Ultimately, wearing clothing is about the way we experience the world. We might spend a few minutes looking in the mirror, but we spend all day in our clothing. So it’s got to work and it can’t impede us from living our lives. How can clothing help us live our lives more gracefully? That’s my main inspiration.

Thank you, Lauren, for sharing your story with us!

Next week, I will post the second half of her interview, in which Lauren gives some insights into the industry that makes cycling (and all sports) clothing. Stay tuned! 

 

Reflective Pants and Shepherdstown

Shepherdstown, WV, is clearly turning into our (well at least my) favorite nearby getaway destination. It was only 2012 when The Mechanic and I first participated in the CASA River Ride, and then two years later, we got married at the Bavarian Inn. This past weekend we decided to go stay at the Bavarian Inn again, and just relax. Every trip to Shepherdstown since our engagement a year ago has been for wedding-related meetings and appointments – not a bad thing, just not casual, random fun. So it was nice to return and be random! IMG_2422

Conveniently, I had just finished my latest reflective fashion project – Butterick 6028 Katherine Tilton pants made out of snakeskin-print corduroy (my favorite fabric of all times!) with of course reflective bias trim in the seams. They were trickier than they should have been – I’m pretty sure the pattern instructions were wrong regarding the zipper fly and the facing. So the inside is not perfect, but whatever. They fit pretty well, despite the high waistline, which I am not used to, and are very comfortable. I wore them to get dinner Friday night, but they officially debuted on Saturday.

It is not quite full autumn colors, but there were enough, plus coupled with some cooler weather and rainy clouds, it felt like fall. So we were appreciative of the fire in the fireplace at Hillsborough Winery, where we stopped for wine tasting. This winery is on the road to Shepherdstown, and every time we have driven past, I have said, “We should stop in some day.” So this time we made a point of starting our trip there. The wines were different and good, but the scenery won the prize.

We watched a bit of the Shepherd University football game, where The Mechanic coined the phrase “artisanal football” – small, local, excellent, not found all over. Come on, you know it’s the next hipster thing! Then an excellent dinner at The Press Room, and a stroll around town in the dark (ooh spooky…), then going to bed early and sleeping late. Ah…. relaxing….

Sunday highlights were stopping at the farmer’s market so I could buy flowers from Megan Webber Flowers, who did our wedding flowers, and whose work I really truly love (She just has such an eye for flower arrangements!), as well as biking on the C&O Canal. We were a bit dismayed to find some construction along the trail around Mile 74, and really hope it is not going to be parking spaces. No cars! Keep it wild and wonderful, and free of too many people! I got a flat tire as we were headed back to Shepherdstown, but luckily I married a bike mechanic, who happily patched up the tire.

It was so nice to feel relaxed and peaceful and very zen, but after our dee-lish vegetarian sandwiches and a WV beer at Domestic, we sadly loaded up the bikes and dove back into the traffic to return to our normal lives. Time to face another week.

C & O Canal zen

C & O Canal zen

Three Generations of Merrell Evera Bicycle Shoes

At last I acknowledged that the basic black Merrell Evera Pure Pumps I have are too small and hurt my feet. The decision makes me sad,  because my other Merrell Evera MJ pumps are my most favorite pair of summer heels. The fact that Merrell no longer makes this line of bicycle-specific heels also makes me sad. Thankfully, I just found last year’s version, the Evera Draft, on Amazon for $35.  Because these have the mary jane strap, I was able to order the shoes in my actual size, and they will stay on. This was the mistake I made with the Evera Pure pumps: I had ordered them a half-size too small, hoping that the size difference would keep them on my feet. Alas no, they have just been too uncomfortable to wear, so I will try to sell them to someone who might fit them.

It was interesting, however, to compare the three generations of these shoes. All three are essentially the same shoe, and yet they are not.

Left to right: Evera MJ, Evera Pure, Evera Draft

Left to right: Evera MJ, Evera Pure, Evera Draft

Similarities:

  • Same foot bed and sole, which Merrell originally claimed was stable for better “midfoot pedal power” as well as their special “sticky” rubber to better grip the pedals
  • Same toe box and style
  • Same name

    Side shot of the MJ, Pure, and Draft, showing the style differences

    Side shot of the MJ, Pure, and Draft, showing the style differences and similarities

Differences:

  • Reflective trim on each pair is different, or in the case of the Draft, non-existent. The Evera MJ summer heels have reflective trim on the edge of the strap, while the Pure pumps have tiny squares on the back of the shoe. Granted, these small spots are not very useful, but it’s the point that Merrell was thinking about bike safety and visibility. I’m disappointed that the Draft doesn’t have any reflective detailing.
  • The cut outs on the side of the heel on the MJ sandals and the Pure pumps are gone from the Draft, which makes them pretty plain and almost boring.
  • The label on the insole is different – on the first two pairs, there is a cycle design, proudly showing these to be shoes for women to wear while biking. Not in the Drafts. Guess Merrell gave that up as a promotional piece.
    Reflective bits, or not

    Reflective bits, or not

    Top: no bike; bottom: bike

    Top: no bike; bottom: bike

I am happy to have the Drafts, and I don’t have a proper pair of brown heels, so they will be great to bike to work in. Nevertheless, I am disappointed that Merrell discontinued making a bicycle-specific shoe line for women. I had been very excited about their winter boots last fall, but perhaps those were a retail flop, which made them pull the plug on the concept. I have heard that women’s bike clothing (and shoes) are still a very small niche market. I guess it is still too small for shoes by a company even as large and popular as Merrell. Thanks for trying, though! Better luck in a few more years?

In Which I Try Coffeeneuring

I’ve secretly been a bit envious of the intrepid Coffeeneurs who, every fall season, bike to far off destinations in search of coffee to share in the Coffeeneuring Challenge. This challenge, organized by Mary at Chasing Mailboxes, is only in its fourth year but seems to have somehow become elevated to a cult-like following. Maybe it’s the coffee? Yet, I’ve never tried to join in, just read triumphant stories with some mild jealousy.

This year, I decided to try it. So far so good – this weekend was the initial weekend, and I think it went pretty well. A group of us from work decided to coffeeneur together, so we met at the Ballston Metro Station and biked to Java Shack. We were somehow the first bike-y people there, so we got the good spots on the bike rack, and we watched as a while later all the Revolution Cycles Sunday morning group ride cyclists started pouring in.

After hanging out for a while, we set off on our Part Two – biking to Falls Church to go to Mike’s Deli at Lazy Sundae, a family-owned sandwich and ice cream shop.

I had iced tea and a dee-lish veggie sandwich, but it was not exactly a “coffeeneuring” defined stop. Right off the W&OD Trail, and not far from the West Falls Church Metro Station, I’m surprised I’d never discovered this place before. Apparently they make their own ice cream, and I noticed that pumpkin pie was one of the listed flavors. My other challenge this month is All Things Pumpkin, so I might have to go back soon!

We decided to stop and play on one of the children’s playgrounds on the W&OD Trail on our way home. Ignoring the “Designed for Children 5-12 Years Old” signs, we tested out everything, even the log run thing, that was much harder than expected. Thank goodness for the slide.

Really, they should make playgrounds for adults. We need them too!

We headed back to Ballston, and our various homes, feeling much happier for having been out on such a gorgeous (albeit a bit chilly) fall day. Was it the coffee? The biking? Or playing on the kids’ playground? Who knows! It was fun.

I got about 12 miles in all together, which is nothing compared to the other people who participate in the Coffeeneuring Challenge, but it’s more than I’ve done in a while, so I was pretty happy about that. But now the pressure is on to keep this up for the next 6 weeks! The Mechanic and I are returning to Shepherdstown, WV, next weekend, and are taking our bikes, but the coffee shop is pretty close to the Bavarian Inn. Maybe we can take the long route? Then after that, well, there are so many options! Where to next?!

 

Reflective Wear-to-Work Challenge, in Review

I did it! I wore something I have made to work for thirteen days in a row! I’m pretty impressed – even I didn’t realize I’d made so much reflective bike fashion!

Week 2

Week One Collage

Week Three

One of the days was sort of a bonus day, since I only made the reflective sash I tied on over my dress and cardigan, so it was more like 12 +1 days.

Seeing everything like this makes me wonder if I need to be more strategic about my projects. Should I try to design mini “collections” each season, that all work together? Or should I just do whatever catches my fancy, as I have been doing? The two projects I’m working on right now, pants and a fancy sweatshirt, are designed to coordinate, although I’m not sure they will once both are done! We’ll see.

But the point of this whole initial idea was to make things I could wear at the office, as well as just around town. Part of me feels like I need to be therefore more strategic, and consider my work shoes and blazers and so on, to make sure everything works together a bit more. Not that any of this is inappropriate, but I could probably step it up a bit.

I also posted each outfit every morning on Instagram (I’m disguised as @earlettef), and on one of the days, I decided to tag the McCalls Pattern Company. They were interested enough that they asked if they could post the top, McCalls 6792, on their Facebook page. Well of course! It got at least 100 “Likes,” 12 Shares, and several comments. I was pretty pleased by that!

McCalls Facebook Love

McCalls Facebook Love

I think it also shows that there could be a market for nice clothing that as reflectivity sewn into it, clothing that does even whisper “tech,” that is just fashionable yet functional. But how best to focus that? I’m still deciding.

It’s been fun wearing my own designs, but the rest of my closet missed me, so for a while, I’ll sort through what is left. Now that the weather has cooled off a bit, it means it could be time to dust off the tweed! Yay!

I need to redesign my sewing space and desk, too...

I need to redesign my sewing space and desk, too…